Mosquito and Mosquito-Borne
Disease Management Plan
At-A-Glance

Our primary goal is to protect public health by managing immature and adult mosquitoes so they do not create a significant risk to our community. In the event that mosquito populations pose a threat or become a public nuisance, we can readily respond by implementing our Mosquito and Mosquito-borne Disease Management Plan which has been approved by our Board of Trustees.

The following outlines our response plan:

Level 1 – Normal Season
We perform routine mosquito, mosquito–borne disease and public health pesticide efficacy surveillance activities. We also engage in extensive public outreach including media campaigns, participate in community events, provide presentations and distribute outreach materials to various organizations.

Level 2 – Dead bird and/or positive mosquito pool
A response is initiated when our Microbiology Laboratory detects a mosquito-borne virus [i.e., West Nile virus (WNV), Western Equine Encephalomyelitis (WEE), St. Louis encephalitis (SLE)] or when the California Department of Public Health (DPH) notifies us of a mosquito-borne virus from a dead bird(s) or mosquito pool(s) within our boundaries. 

Level 3 – Sentinel chicken/animal
A response is initiated when our Microbiology Laboratory detects conversion to a mosquito-borne virus (i.e., WNV, WEE, SLE) in a sentinel chicken(s) or when DPH notifies us of a mosquito-borne virus infected horse or other animal within the our boundaries.

Level 4 – Locally acquired human case
A response is initiated when the County Public Health Laboratory or DPH officials notify us that a human has locally acquired a mosquito-borne virus (i.e., WNV, WEE, or SLE) disease within our boundaries.

Level 5 – Multiple Human Cases, Epidemic Conditions
A response is initiated when County Public Health Laboratory or DPH officials notify us that multiple mosquito-borne virus (i.e., WNV, WEE, or SLE) infections have occurred in humans within a specific area or there is evidence that epidemic conditions exist. The epidemic area is defined as the geographic region in which human cases are clustered (incorporated city, community, neighborhood or zip code). We continue to assess the public health risk associated with the mosquito-borne virus (i.e., WNV, WEE, or SLE) by completing the Mosquito-borne Disease Report.

For an in-depth copy of the Mosquito and Mosquito-Borne Disease Management Plan, please click here. 

 

 

 


Did you know?
It may take several months for a larva to develop to the adult stage in cold water.